Adobe Photoshop for Beginners: Using Content Aware Scale and Fill

The content-aware tools in Photoshop are an incredibly powerful way of using pixels in an image and manipulating them. You can do a lot with content-aware scale, making an object look bigger or smaller by filling in or removing pixels. There are a lot of things possible when using this tool.

If you’d like to see the rest of my mini-reviews for this tutorial series, you can do so here.

In today’s lesson, we will be using the following assets:

Adobe for Beginners

We will be using the first image of the bee on the flower. It is hard to see it as this is a white background, but the original image is smaller and the canvas larger. Ideally, we want to extend our image’s background to cover the larger portion of the canvas that shows as a transparent part of the image when using the PSD file in Photoshop. You can do this using the “crop tool” with the content-aware scale option.

To make this change in the image, we use our edit menu and then choose “content-aware scale”. This will fill in the “extra” portion of our image by copying the pixels in the background and making it look like the image is larger.

You want to end up with something like this:

Edited by Darkside Creative

As you can see in the image I’ve edited above, the background has extended, but it doesn’t look “stretched” and looks exactly like the background in the image.

PRO TIP: Not every image will work well with content-aware scale. The best types of images to use are images with the same colour in the background (or close to the same colour). You cannot use this tool for every instance as it will not yield the same results every time.

Let’s use the second image asset for more content-aware scale editing. We want to do a similar thing with this image by extending the background to use this image as a header for let’s say our Facebook profile or even for Twitter (size constraints will vary).

Let’s apply our content-aware tool to this image and see how we go (remember using the crop tool to extend the image and then edit>content-aware scale to fill in the blank canvas).

You should end up with something looking like this:

Edited by Darkside Creative

We want to try something new with our next image by grouping the plants in this image a little closer together. To achieve that, we will be using the same technique except instead of extending the canvas outward, we want to push things closer together, so going inward.

You should end up with something that looks like this:

Edited by Darkside Creative

In our final example, we are going to do two things to the image. We will extend it just like we did with the first example except something in the image is not going to work with that technique. If you simply extend the last image’s background, you will distort the paper that is on the desk. And we don’t want that to happen. So we need to find a way to protect that part of the image when we are editing it with our crop tool. To do this, we need to select this part of the image by using any selection tool you like (I’m using the quick select tool) and then saving that selection.

Once you’ve saved the selection, you can then begin with the content-aware editing part of the technique just as we did with the first image. When you choose “edit>content-aware scale, you will need to use the drop-down menu where it says “Protect” on the toolbar and choose whatever you saved your selection as. This will avoid distorting that part of the image – pretty cool, huh?

Okay so with that done, you simply apply the technique with content-aware and voila! You should end up with something that looks like this:

Edited by Darkside Creative

Just remember our pro top above – NOT every image will be the correct type of image to use this time-saving technique, but with the image examples we’ve used above, it’s perfect!

Well, that’s it for this tutorial review, and we only have one last portion left to learn, and we will have the Adobe Photoshop for Beginners by Envato Tuts completed and that’s a HUGE achievement people!

Please let me know if you’re following this tutorial series or if you have any comments or questions about any of the art on this blog. I’d be keen to discuss with you!

Until tomorrow, stay safe out there, keep creating, and I’ll catch you in the next post!

If you like my Photoshop posts, you can check out more of them right here.

And while you’re there, why not consider following me which you can do here.

Thanks for your support!

Adobe Photoshop for Beginners: Retouching With the Photoshop Healing Brush

We are now into the last section of this course and learning to manipulate images by “retouching” them or making them look more appealing to the eye.

If you’d like to see the rest of my mini-reviews for this tutorial series, you can do so here.

In today’s lesson we will be using the following assets:

With each of these files we will be removing things from the image such as blemishes for the head shot of the model, graffiti in the second shot from the wall and the person and picture frame entirely from the last image.

We’ll begin with the head shot of the model first above.

You will be opening this file in photoshop and then using the “Spot Healing Brush” tool from the tool bar to remove blemishes from this model’s face. For retouching, you can pretty much do whatever you want as long as you don’t destroy the original source image (by not creating a separate layer) or making the image look too “retouched” and therefore obvious. The idea is to make the image better but not fake to anyone looking at it.

PRO TIP: ALWAYS MAKE SURE YOU ARE USING THE “CONTENT AWARE” OPTION FOR THIS TYPE OF RETOUCHING AND TO TICK THE OPTION TO “SAMPLE ALL LAYERS”

Create a second layer above your head shot and name that layer “retouching layer”. This is where you will be making all the changes and the original file will not be touched (remember destructive versus non-destructive editing?) Very important to get into the habit of doing this whenever you are editing a source file.

To make the retouching look more realistic, we can use the “opacity” tool in the layer menu to create a more realistic looking image. It should be difficult to tell if a face or image has been photo shopped or not. That is the art of retouching masterfully as opposed to creating fake looking images.

Here is my final image:

Retouched by Darkside Creative

And the second image only works because the brick wall is so damaged and has probably had a lot of graffiti on it. This technique would not work very well with a perfect brick wall (that’s definitely an intermediate or even advanced technique).

Retouched by Darkside Creative

And our final example has as woman walking past a wall and we want to make the wall look a little nicer, remove the woman entirely and the picture hanging above her so it looks something like this:

Retouched by Darkside Creative

And that’s it for another tutorial review – only a few more to go before we complete this entire course! Can you believe it we are almost there!

Please let me know if you’re following this tutorial series or if you have any comments or questions about any of the art on this blog. I’d be keen to discuss with you!

Until tomorrow, stay safe out there, keep creating and I’ll catch you in the next post!

If you like my Photoshop posts, you can check out more of them right here.

And while you’re there, why not consider following me which you can do here.

Thanks for your support!

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Adobe Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop for Beginners: Transform and Wrap

After finishing off Smart Objects in the last post, we are now moving onto using Transform and Wrap and getting very close to the end of this course!

If you’d like to see the rest of my mini-reviews for this tutorial series, you can do so here.

In today’s lesson we will be using the following assets:

Adobe for Beginners
Adobe for Beginners
Adobe for Beginners

As with the previous tutorial, you will be using the above vector files from Illustrator which are provided by the course instructor. As you can see one is a flat logo file and the other one is called a brand file for branding something which we’ll be doing in this tutorial.

You will start off with this asset first:

Adobe for Beginners

Once you open this up in Photoshop, we will then be using the logo file first so you will need to bring that into photoshop using the transform tool. Our objective with this file is to make it look as flat as possible so that it sits on the table in the image as part of the table (it could be a sticker placed onto the table). Just remember that we need to rasterize these images so we won’t be using smart objects for this exercise (make sure you disable it in by right-clicking on the image and choosing “rasterize image”).

You will need to use the transform tool to make the logo look as flat and realistic as possible. It should hopefully look something similar to what I’ve done here:

Made by Darkside Creative

The next step is using the warp tool which is one part of the transform tool’s many options. Warping is exactly as it sounds – you are going to bend and squish and pull and push the brand into shape so that it looks kind of like it’s wrapped around our cup mock up like this (remember to rasterize!)

Created by Darkside Creative

And the final step to make the logo and the branding look more realistic is to add a “multiply” blending effect to darken the logo and branding file as I have done above by choosing the blend mode from the drop-down menu in the layer window.

Does your mock up look like it’s ready to show to your client? These techniques are used by graphic designers the world over when preparing and creating mock up ideas for their clients. It helps your client to visualise what their brand might look like on a coffee cup or a table for instance.

And that’s another short and sweet tutorial to get you warping and transforming like a pro! I hope you enjoyed this tutorial review.

Please let me know if you’re following this tutorial series or if you have any comments or questions about any of the art on this blog. I’d be keen to discuss with you!

Until tomorrow, stay safe out there, keep creating and I’ll catch you in the next post!

If you like my Photoshop posts, you can check out more of them right here.

And while you’re there, why not consider following me which you can do here.

Thanks for your support!

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Adobe Photoshop for Beginners: Smart Objects

After finishing off Selections and Masking in the last post, we are now moving onto using Smart Objects.

If you’d like to see the rest of this tutorial series, you can do so here.

In today’s lesson we will be using the following assets:

Part of this tutorial talks about vector files and Adobe Illustrator because the icon file you see above of the “F” is made in Adobe Illustrator. You will be incorporating this icon into your flyer to make a “hero graphic” in the background.

You don’t need to use Adobe Illustrator if you don’t have access to it or you don’t know how to use it. That’s perfectly fine, the assets are all provided for you including the illustrator file above. You will start off with this asset first:

Once you open this up in Photoshop, we will then add the flower asset above – use our scaling skills and tools to scale it to the correct size so that it sits at the bottom of our layers. You can position it however you want but I would just copy the tutor. Now, this is where the magic happens. If you scaled it down using the transform tool, you will notice that the quality of the image is terrible. That is because we scaled it using transform and we didn’t make the image a smart object first. If you make an image a smart object, it retains all of the image’s quality so you can resize and transform as much as you want and never lose the quality of your image.

Using smart objects, make your image a smart object, scale it correctly to sit under your layers and then add the icon above. We want to copy that into our image, add a white overlay on normal setting by right clicking on the logo. Then make a duplicate because we want a smaller version of the logo for this image as well. Then you want to adjust the opacity so that it fades into the background like a watermark. Make it a smart object and then you can scale it around so that it looks similar to this when you’re done:

Created by Darkside Creative

Can you see how we used the logo in two places to make this flyer really stand out?

And that’s all there is to it! Smart objects in Photoshop are so easy to use and it really is a wonderful tool for scaling objects and retaining the image quality.

Please let me know if you’re following this tutorial series or if you have any comments or questions about any of the art on this blog. I’d be keen to discuss with you!

Until tomorrow, stay safe out there, keep creating and I’ll catch you in the next post!

If you like my Photoshop posts, you can check out more of them right here.

And while you’re there, why not consider following me which you can do here.

Thanks for your support!

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Adobe Adobe Photoshop

Adobe Photoshop for Beginners: Select and Mask

In today’s lesson in the Selections and Masking group of videos, we’ll be learning how to use the select and mask function in Photoshop.

If you’d like to see the rest of this tutorial series, you can do so here.

In today’s lesson we will be using the following assets:

What we want to do first is use the quick selection tool and make another selection from the flower image. Remember to use the bracket keys as a shortcut to increase and decrease the size of your tool when selecting. That is a fairly easy thing to select because for the most part, it’s one image contrasted well against another.

But this time we’re going to take the image of the model and remove the background, replace it with another background and then select and mask out the previous background so it looks realistic.

This is a much bigger step to learn and now that Photoshop has select and mask, the task of masking things out using complex images with hair or grass has become a lot easier. It used to be almost impossible to make clean selections prior to select and mask being added and refined in Photoshop.

So we want to add a mask to our image and then load the new background image we want to use. We will begin with using quick select to mask the model and then go into select and mask to refine the edges with those tools. It might take you several attempts to get it looking reasonably okay.

When you’ve completed the steps using select and mask, don’t forget to use the option “decontaminate colours”. With a blue background and black hair, you’re going to see the colours bleeding into each other. To resolve that, make sure you have the “decontaminate colours” option checked.

What you should end up with is something like this:

Created by Darkside Creative

And that’s the lesson! How well did you do? Let me know in the comments!

Also, please let me know if you’re following this tutorial series or if you have any comments or questions about any of the art on this blog. I’d be keen to discuss with you!

Until tomorrow, stay safe out there, keep creating and I’ll catch you in the next post!

If you like my Photoshop posts, you can check out more of them right here.

And while you’re there, why not consider following me which you can do here.

Thanks for your support!